Creatieve Industrie
World Press Photo Special

Visions of Africa

International photographers from across the continent present four contemporary perspectives on Africa.
This event is in English
Free admission
Wednesday 19 Apr, 20.00
wo 19 apr, 20.00
Grote zaal
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With the World Press Photo Festival 2017 coming up, we have invited internationally renowned photographers to highlight special projects that offer a contemporary views on Africa. What visual stories on Africa need to be told? You will hear about pressing topics such as conservation issues and sustainability, as well as Instagram photography and poetic images on identity. This evening is also the launch of Everyday Africa’s first book showing pictures by 30 photographers that re-imagine the continent.

Everyday Africa

Everyday Africa is a successful Instagram platform giving photographers a chance to show what is happening in African daily life. It provides an alternative view to what we see in mainstream media. One of the founders, Peter DiCampo, will be present to launch the photo book Everyday Africa: 30 Photographers Re-Picturing a Continent, in which the pictures are shown with Instagram comments about them. Sometimes shocking, sometimes funny, and sometimes heartfelt, the comments manifest the most common perceptions of Africa while underscoring the continent’s increased connectivity in a globalised world. Book designer Teun van der Heijden will join the conversation.

© Everyday Africa

© Everyday Africa Instagram

Tshepiso Mazibuko – Free from My Happiness

Tshepiso was born in the township of Thokoza, Ekurhuleni in South Africa, and her work tells the stories of people who live close to her by documenting her own township. She has participated in numerous international exhibitions, most recently the Addis Ababa Foto-Fest 2016, where she won the first prize in Addis Ababa Foto-fest Awards. Tshepiso will discuss her recent photo book Free from My Happiness.

Nyani Quarmyne – World Press Photo African masterclasses

Nyani Quarmyne is a Ghanaian photographer who was a master for the World Press Photo Masterclass West Africa and will present his own work. With Juliette Garms, education program coordinator at the World Press Photo Foundation and one of the organisers of both masterclasses, Nyani will present some of the new work from the World Press Photo Masterclass East Africa, held in Nairobi in November last year, Kenya, and in Masterclass West Africa held in Accra, Ghana in March. These satellite masterclasses support the most promising young visual journalists from the region in their professional development and follow in the tradition of the well-known World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass. The masterclass in Ghana was organized in cooperation with Noorderlicht Photography and NUKU Studio from Accra. The latter two are creating a photographic documentation project on Northern Ghana in conjunction with an academic research program about the same region.

Laura El-Tantawy – The Shadow of the Pyramids

Laura El-Tantawy is an Egyptian photographer. Born in England, she attended high school in Saudi Arabia, started university in Cairo, Egypt and completed her degree in the US. Living between East and West for much of her life has been a source of both immense enlightenment and considerable anxiety — contemplating notions of home, identity, culture and ‘the self’. In 2015 Laura published In The Shadow of the Pyramids, regarded as one of the best photo books of that year, and a great example of storytelling that provides an intimate account exploring memory and identity in the events leading to the Egyptian revolution of 2011.

Brent Stirton – Photography in Southern Africa

Brent Stirton is a South African photojournalist working for National Geographic Magazine and many other respected international titles. Brent has received nine awards from World Press Photo and ten prizes from The Pictures of the Year International contest for his coverage of wildlife and conservation issues, global health, diminishing cultures, sustainability and the environment. He will share his experiences in the field working for organizations such as WWF, CNN, the Ford, Clinton and Gates Foundations and the Nike Foundation. One of his most recent projects focuses on the demand in Asia for rhino horn – traditionally valued for its medicinal properties. The demand is rising steeply, as increasing prosperity in the region means more people can afford to pay the extremely high prices involved. This puts growing pressure on a species already threatened with extinction. In 2007, South Africa, home to 70 percent of the world’s rhinos, reported losing just 13 to poachers; by 2015 that had risen to 1,175. Unlike elephant tusks, rhino horn grows back when cut properly. Rhino rancher John Hume is among those attempting to end the international ban on trading in rhino horn, and to farm rhinos commercially, a move fiercely opposed by conservationists, who say a legal trade could doom rhinos.

One of his most recent projects focuses on the demand in Asia for rhino horn – traditionally valued for its medicinal properties. The demand is rising steeply, as increasing prosperity in the region means more people can afford to pay the extremely high prices involved. This puts growing pressure on a species already threatened with extinction. In 2007, South Africa, home to 70 percent of the world’s rhinos, reported losing just 13 to poachers; by 2015 that had risen to 1,175. Unlike elephant tusks, rhino horn grows back when cut properly. Rhino rancher John Hume is among those attempting to end the international ban on trading in rhino horn, and to farm rhinos commercially, a move fiercely opposed by conservationists, who say a legal trade could doom rhinos.

‘Visions of Africa’ is organised by the World Press Photo Foundation, PhotoQ and Pakhuis de Zwijger. The evening will be moderated by Lars Boering, managing director at the World Press Photo Foundation and Edie Peters, founder of PhotoQ.

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This event is in English
Free admission
Wednesday 19 Apr, 20.00
Grote zaal
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